• 6 rotties

    From August Abolins@618:510/1.1 to Arelor on Fri Nov 13 19:22:00 2020
    Hello Arelor!

    ** On Thursday 12.11.20 - 17:03, Arelor wrote to Mark Hofmann:

    I have 6 Rottweilers home. I don't think they count as
    security, because most of the time they can be found
    sleeping around my feet.

    Do you have a "family" photo that you can share? I can
    imagine 6 rotties at your feet (preferrably alert) would make
    a great photo.




    --
    ../|ug

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  • From Arelor@618:250/24 to August Abolins on Sat Nov 14 03:00:12 2020
    Re: 6 rotties
    By: August Abolins to Arelor on Fri Nov 13 2020 07:22 pm

    Hello Arelor!

    ** On Thursday 12.11.20 - 17:03, Arelor wrote to Mark Hofmann:

    I have 6 Rottweilers home. I don't think they count as
    security, because most of the time they can be found
    sleeping around my feet.

    Do you have a "family" photo that you can share? I can
    imagine 6 rotties at your feet (preferrably alert) would make
    a great photo.




    --
    ../|ug

    Maybe I have some around. I will go through the album and upload some if I find it, when I get back home.

    I have the same problem with the dogs I have with the horses. As soon as they see a camera, they run towards it to play with it, so taking a good pic is challenging.

    Horses are slightly worse there, though.
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  • From August Abolins@618:510/1.1 to Arelor on Sat Nov 14 19:33:00 2020
    Hello Arelor!

    ** On Saturday 14.11.20 - 03:00, Arelor wrote to August Abolins:

    I have the same problem with the dogs I have with the horses. As soon as they see a camera, they run towards it to play with it, so taking a good pic is challenging.

    Your dogs don't understand the Spanish version of "Stay"?

    I had a large dog that responded poorly to STAY. In all other
    respects he was very obedient unless he caught an interesting
    scent then he would simply follow his nose no matter what.

    But one day I got so frustrated with his disregard to even
    learn "STAY", that I when he was bounding down the driveway
    towards the road and I knew there were cars coming, I stomped
    my foot on the ground very hard and yelled "WAIT, damn it" at
    the same time - and he stopped and cowered a bit and looked
    back at me. From then on, the command WAIT was his version
    for STAY. It worked well. He always received loving praise
    and a good scratch behind his ears as a reward just before the
    "release" word.

    Back to photos..

    Sometimes it can be worth hiring a professional pet
    photographer to help take a classy shot along side your pets.


    --
    ../|ug

    --- OpenXP 5.0.46
    * Origin: my little micronet point (618:510/1.1)
  • From Arelor@618:250/24 to August Abolins on Sun Nov 15 04:27:03 2020
    Re: 6 rotties
    By: August Abolins to Arelor on Sat Nov 14 2020 07:33 pm

    Your dogs don't understand the Spanish version of "Stay"?

    Some of them do better than others.

    Also, the ones who do know "stay" means not to move from their place, not to stay still. So they will will keep sitting nicely on their asses while putting their paw on the face of the dog next to them or something, or running their tongue on his face.

    e have also the problem that some of the digs don't like each other very much and prefer not to have them together unless really necessary.
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  • From August Abolins@618:250/1.9 to Arelor on Sun Nov 15 08:48:00 2020
    Hello Arelor!

    ** On Sunday 15.11.20 - 04:27, Arelor wrote to August Abolins:

    Also, the ones who do know "stay" means not to move from
    their place, not to stay still. So they will will keep
    sitting nicely on their asses while putting their paw on
    the face of the dog next to them or something, or running
    their tongue on his face.

    I can imagine that can be so annoying, yet it is so funny!
    Our pets can give us the right amount of constant joy.


    e have also the problem that some of the digs don't like
    each other very much and prefer not to have them together
    unless really necessary.

    I had a couple of dogs (an older uncle and nephew) that would
    not seem to get along when they happend to be in a situation
    that put them in close proximity to each other. Even a simple
    off-leash excursion in the backfields could be a problem if I
    needed them both to heed and "COME" back or something.

    One time I was so fed up with their behaviour, I grabbed them
    by the collars of their necks and placed their heads together
    side-by-side. OH BOY.. the growling and struggle started.
    But I persisted and included loud words to suggest
    disappointment. When one dog would make the first sound, I
    would state his name, express "STOP IT!" and force his head
    down to the ground. When they calmed down, I would release and
    we would go our usual merry way. This required a few repeated
    attempts - at first 2 or three during each outting. I would
    mix it up so that they would not know how many times this
    training would occur. Sometimes the outting would be cut
    short as a lessor reward. Sometimes there would be a meaty
    treat if they cooperated.

    But eventually, they learned to not struggle and cope with
    their heads side be side. It was funny to see the eyes turned
    to the side at each other.

    One of the same dogs had an issue with a new gentle female
    border collie puppy. The collie was so sweet and just wanted
    to be friends. The older guy would have none of her. Same
    treatment: down to the ground he went. Eventually, he
    learned to not dare raise the slightest indication of attitude
    towards the collie.

    --
    ../|ug

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  • From Kurt Weiske@618:300/1 to August Abolins on Sun Nov 15 08:05:00 2020
    August Abolins wrote to Arelor <=-

    Your dogs don't understand the Spanish version of "Stay"?

    I had a friend who had a nanny who spoke English as a second
    language. She taught the family dog all sort of tricks - in Spanish.




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  • From August Abolins@618:250/1.9 to Kurt Weiske on Mon Nov 16 10:09:00 2020
    Hello Kurt!

    ** On Sunday 15.11.20 - 08:05, Kurt Weiske wrote to August Abolins:

    August Abolins wrote to Arelor <=-

    Your dogs don't understand the Spanish version of "Stay"?

    I had a friend who had a nanny who spoke English as a second
    language. She taught the family dog all sort of tricks - in Spanish.

    I've heard of many bi-lingual people training their dogs in
    their mother tongue. I thought of that too, but the word for
    COME in Latvian actually sounds like Nazi. LOL. Imagine me in
    public and calling my dog with that!

    --
    ../|ug

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  • From Arelor@618:250/24 to August Abolins on Mon Nov 16 15:50:09 2020
    Re: 6 rotties
    By: August Abolins to Kurt Weiske on Mon Nov 16 2020 10:09 am

    Hello Kurt!

    ** On Sunday 15.11.20 - 08:05, Kurt Weiske wrote to August Abolins:

    August Abolins wrote to Arelor <=-

    Your dogs don't understand the Spanish version of "Stay"?

    I had a friend who had a nanny who spoke English as a second
    language. She taught the family dog all sort of tricks - in Spanish.

    I've heard of many bi-lingual people training their dogs in
    their mother tongue. I thought of that too, but the word for
    COME in Latvian actually sounds like Nazi. LOL. Imagine me in
    public and calling my dog with that!

    --
    ../|ug

    We use a mixture of languages. A Spanish and English hybrid.

    I like short words for commands, so I pick the shorter between English and Spanish.

    "Sit" is shorter than "Siéntate", for example.

    English is a very compact language.
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  • From Daryl Stout@618:250/33 to Kurt Weiske on Mon Nov 16 09:52:00 2020
    Kurt,

    Your dogs don't understand the Spanish version of "Stay"?

    I had a friend who had a nanny who spoke English as a second
    language. She taught the family dog all sort of tricks - in Spanish.

    Crusoe, the weiner dog extraordinare, of Ryan Beauchesne, and his
    girl, Lauren (Crusoe refers to her a "Mum" <G>), understands commands
    in English and in French. Yet, the dachshunds originally were from
    Germany.

    He has numerous videos on YouTube.

    Daryl

    ... Can you tell me when my past due amount is due??
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  • From August Abolins@618:250/1.9 to Arelor on Tue Nov 17 01:51:00 2020
    Hello Arelor!

    ** On Monday 16.11.20 - 15:50, Arelor wrote to August Abolins:

    I like short words for commands, so I pick the shorter
    between English and Spanish.

    "Sit" is shorter than "Siéntate", for example.

    English is a very compact language.


    Compact. That is a good observation. "Nazi" is two syllables,
    yet "Come" is one.

    Trouble is that one of my dog's name was Monster. "Monster,
    NAZI" in public could be interpreted by humans as "August is
    delusional, again."

    Dogs can quickly discern a combination of sounds.

    For instance, I played a seek-n-find game with my border
    collie. It was entirely in Latvian. Basically, I would use
    the prefix "Where is" and then add the object I wanted her to
    find.

    We started with "Where is the ball?" In Latvian it is "Kur ir
    bumba?" We'd walk around together, and I would show her the
    ball and say "bumba" a few times and place it somewhere while
    she was watching. Then we'd walk around away from that
    location for a few minutes. After those minutes I'd ask her
    "Kur ir bumba?" ..and she'd go right to the spot, get the
    ball and bring it back to me.

    I extended the play with different objects at the same time.
    One object at location A, and another object at location B.

    We'd be even 100ft away from either location, totally
    distracted with something else, and I'd stop and ask her "Kur
    ir <noun for object B>", and she'd stop and think for a bit
    (that was fun to watch) and she'd take off and bring back
    object B!

    The game paid off one time when I apparently dropped my car
    keys somewhere in the long grass. I had covered a lot of
    ground prior to noticing that the keys were missing - so I was
    a bit frantic.

    "Kur ir atslegas?" She found them.

    Good thing I used my keys in the game prior!

    She pick up in the "Kur ir [x]" game very fast, within 3 days.

    --
    ../|ug

    --- OpenXP 5.0.47
    * Origin: (} Pointy McPointface (618:250/1.9)
  • From Arelor@618:250/24 to August Abolins on Tue Nov 17 03:22:13 2020
    Re: 6 rotties
    By: August Abolins to Arelor on Tue Nov 17 2020 01:51 am

    Hello Arelor!

    ** On Monday 16.11.20 - 15:50, Arelor wrote to August Abolins:

    I like short words for commands, so I pick the shorter
    between English and Spanish.

    "Sit" is shorter than "Siéntate", for example.

    English is a very compact language.


    Compact. That is a good observation. "Nazi" is two syllables,
    yet "Come" is one.

    Trouble is that one of my dog's name was Monster. "Monster,
    NAZI" in public could be interpreted by humans as "August is
    delusional, again."

    Dogs can quickly discern a combination of sounds.

    For instance, I played a seek-n-find game with my border
    collie. It was entirely in Latvian. Basically, I would use
    the prefix "Where is" and then add the object I wanted her to
    find.

    We started with "Where is the ball?" In Latvian it is "Kur ir
    bumba?" We'd walk around together, and I would show her the
    ball and say "bumba" a few times and place it somewhere while
    she was watching. Then we'd walk around away from that
    location for a few minutes. After those minutes I'd ask her
    "Kur ir bumba?" ..and she'd go right to the spot, get the
    ball and bring it back to me.

    I extended the play with different objects at the same time.
    One object at location A, and another object at location B.

    We'd be even 100ft away from either location, totally
    distracted with something else, and I'd stop and ask her "Kur
    ir <noun for object B>", and she'd stop and think for a bit
    (that was fun to watch) and she'd take off and bring back
    object B!

    The game paid off one time when I apparently dropped my car
    keys somewhere in the long grass. I had covered a lot of
    ground prior to noticing that the keys were missing - so I was
    a bit frantic.

    "Kur ir atslegas?" She found them.

    Good thing I used my keys in the game prior!

    She pick up in the "Kur ir [x]" game very fast, within 3 days.

    --
    ../|ug

    Hahaha, dogs are amazing.

    You have reminded me of a dog we had. We'd play a similar game.

    One day my mother was joking she was able to understand complex sentences and told her "Go search the ball at Árelor's room". She darted upstairs to my room and fetched a ball from the ball stash I had in a corner... and we had never taught her "Go search X at Y".


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  • From August Abolins@618:250/1.9 to Arelor on Tue Nov 17 08:04:00 2020
    Hello Arelor!

    ** On Tuesday 17.11.20 - 03:22, Arelor wrote to August Abolins:

    "Kur ir atslegas?" She found them.

    Good thing I used my keys in the game prior!

    She pick up in the "Kur ir [x]" game very fast, within 3 days.


    Hahaha, dogs are amazing.

    You have reminded me of a dog we had. We'd play a similar game.

    One day my mother was joking she was able to understand complex sentences and told her "Go search the ball at Árelor's room". She darted upstairs
    to my room and fetched a ball from the ball stash I had in a corner... and we had never taught her "Go search X at Y".

    Dog CPU = "find, ball, room"

    They are always listening and probably understand more than we
    know.

    I always wondered why they yawn a lot when you try to give
    them a lecture.


    --
    ../|ug

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